The brutal Murder of Dystiny Myers

The picture above is Dystiny Myers, she was a 15-year-old high school student in Santa Maria, California. She was placed in a group home after her mom went to jail 2 months before her murder for a misdemeanor charge of being under the influence of an illegal drug.

She was raised by her grandmother and everyone who knew her described her as being full of life. Her Pastor, Rick Bloom said she loved to sing and perform. He also said she was the lead in the majority of the children’s choir programs. She also attended church camps and consistently volunteered to feed the homeless.

She dreamed of being a model and even won a local competition. She could be the all-American girl right?

Pastor Bloom told reporters, “Everyone thinks about what we could have done. I know her grandmother and she did the best she could in very difficult circumstances,” “She didn’t get a chance to grow out of whatever she was going through,” Bloom said.

Dystiny’s 7th grade science teacher Mr. Bob Quirk said “She could have gone to college she could have done anything. Very bright. Very talented person. Sang. She was in our talent show,”

It wont let me post up the video right now so to view Dystiny singing in a school Talent Show, click link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vA_lIm9J6zM&feature=player_embedded (Dystiny starts singing at 3:35)

She looks like any other normal teenager in this picture but unfortunately she got caught up with some adults that she shouldn’t have. She ran away from the home and stayed with Rhonda Wisto, a known drug addict and alleged dealer.

On September 26, 2010 the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s office received a phone call at 5AM to come to a location and investigate a body that was found on the outskirts of town. At first it was the fire department who showed up believing there was a grass fire but they soon found out that wasn’t the case. Deputies would soon find out that the person that was purposely thrown into shallow grave and set on fire was a 15-year-old local girl.

Later that day deputies arrested Jason Greenwell (20), Ty Michael Hill (28), Frank York(19) and Rhonda Wisto (47). They are all being charged with Dystiny Myers murder and special circumstances of torture, kidnapping and aiding and abetting.

The following day Cody Lane Miller (20) was arrested. He was in the hospital receiving care for his injuries.

All five of them are being held without bail and they have all entered not guilty pleas.

On October 4 the news released an article that said perhaps Dystiny was not the girl everyone thought she was, they also released this picture of her. It was from her MySpace account.

Dystiny takes a photo of herself, her appearance is slowly changing

In reality Pastor Bloom says she was once that girl he spoke of earlier on but she had gotten off track in the last year and lost her way.

Sadly, Dystiny had begun hanging out in the streets where she called herself “Spa3dz” and her past times included partying, drinking hard liquor, getting high and smoking “cancer stix” as she called them.

Dystiny Myers colors her hair black, her attitude starts to change as well, and she begins hanging with the wrong crowd

“wats crakn,mi name is dystiny but they call me (SPAD3Z) i luv2 par-t(haha)i dn’t drink beer though”IMA A HARD LIQUOR HYNA” i luv smokn MARIJUANA!!!(STONRS 4 LIFE) i’m also a nicotine fein,i luv my CANCER STIX.. ima helza good homie..no mattr wat my homies always cme 1st there my FAMILIO u can fuk with me but once u fuk with my homies there will be BLOOD SHED!!! i gots lots of h8rs…i aint evn trippn off them bitches all they are is (DRAMA) DNT HATE DA PLAYER,HATE DA GAME!!! L8TRS”

Click here to view Dystiny Myers Myspace – It list her age as 19 years old, the age she would be today.

Rhonda Wisto, the mother of Jason Greenwell, urged her son to go through with the horrific murder of Dystiny Myers. She also helped the group hid her body.

She also started hanging out in known drug dealers houses that had been raided in the past. Mr. Quirk, her former teacher said she dropped out of school after the first 5 weeks of high school. “If a kid like this can end up in this situation, it can happen to anybody,” Quirk said.

On February 7, 2011 all 5 suspects appeared in court for their pre-trial hearings. Normally a first degree murder charge would carry a 25 to life sentence but since there are special circumstances in Dystiny’s murder they can all be sentenced to death or life without parole.

Photo of Ty Hill who took part in Dystiny’s murder, he was also the one who shot her up with heroin moments before the attack
Ty Hill admitted to shooting Dystiny up with heroin before they beat her, he shot her up every night so she wouldn’t have suspected anything was wrong.

He then started beating the hell out of her with a baseball bat before handing it off to another guy and saying “Mark McGwire” her legs.

Jason Greenwell said the noise from the “bat bashing against her legs was making him sick and he couldn’t think,”

An expert testified that Dystiny more than likely died from mechanical asphyxiation but was also suffering from methamphetamine toxicity and blunt force trauma to her head.

MUGSHOT: Frank York

Forensic Specialist Kenneth Jones said he found a baseball bat in Rhonda Wisto’s truck that had finger prints and blood on it. He also testified there was a palm print that matched Frank York’s prints.

Mr. Jones also found three samurai swords and brass knuckles in that same blue pick-up truck; two of the swords had blood stains and strands of long, dark hair on them. There were numerous blood stains in the pickup; the blood has not been tested for DNA yet.

Deputy Stuart MacDonald from the coroner’s office said when they discovered 15-year-old Dystiny Myers’ body she was wrapped in a canvas bag, duct tape, several comforters and nylon rope. The young teen was also hog-tied and had sweatpants tied tightly around her neck and gloves in her mouth and throat.

Cody Miller being arrained in court back in 2010

Dystiny also had bruising on her body from her face to her back and down to her legs. She also had fractures on her skull and her eye had been gouged out. Parts of her body, including her face had been burnt beyond recognition.

Detective Eric Twisselman from the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Department testified that Cody Miller told him that they all beat Dystiny at Rhonda Wisto’s house. After the beating took place they “stuffed her into a duffel bag and taken outside the residence and ultimately placed into the back of a pickup truck,”

Dystiny was still alive at this point and once they got out to the location Cody claims he was “forced” to beat her more, dig a hole and hog-tie her.

When Ty Hill asked how he knew she was dead Cody said that “he rammed a glove down her throat and that he plucked her eye out,”

Detective Burgeson testified that at least two of the suspects admitted to beating Dystiny with a baseball bat, brass knuckles, hands and feet. “I asked Miller why he had kicked Dystiny, and he told me that she was making noise and that he kicked her twice and that she stopped making noise,”

MUGSHOT: Jason Greenwell

Rhonda Wisto is Frank York’s mother. He told his mother while all this was going that killing someone was the wrong thing to do. Rhonda told her son, sometimes “stuff” has to be done. “She told him that he would be okay and that she loved him and that she wanted the best for him,” Det. Burgeson testified.

They also planned to kill Cody Miller, the plan was to murder him and cut his head off according to Ty Hill. He said after they set Dystiny on fire Ty Hill hit Cody Miller in the head with a shovel and baseball bat, he planned to kill him to because he believed he was a police informant. Cody was able to get away and ran into woods.

They got in the truck and went to Jack in the Box where they spent $8 on tacos and then went home.

Sheriff’s detective Patrick Zuchelli testified that all 5 suspects were under the influence of methamphetamines while they beat and murdered the teenager. He said it was unclear if Dystiny was voluntarily using drugs by the suspects statements.

Mugshot of Cody Miller whose nose was broken due to getting attacked immediately after  Dystiny’s death.

Det. Zuchelli also testified that Frank York also told him he wanted to back out before the beatings began because he was scared but was encouraged not to by his mother.

Ty Hill tried to minimize his role in the plan but eventually gave up and told the detectives everything he knew including he was the one that actually made a “check list” of everything they would need to murder Dystiny and pull the plan off without getting caught. Police found the list when they found the baseball bat that had Dystiny and Cody’s blood on it.

So far the only motive for killing Dystiny is because she was being disrespectful.

The judge has agreed that there is enough evidence to carry the case to trial and all 5 suspects were sentenced and will never see the day of light again.

The family and friend’s of Dystiny all gathered shortly after her brutal murder to remember the good memories of the bright teenager they knew and loved.

The family and loved ones gathered shortly after the brutal murder to celebrate the short  life of Dystiny Myers

Although five suspects were arrested and are awaiting trail… Dystiny’s grandmother, Kathy Clark said she has no closure.

“There really isn’t. We take it one day at a time and we know that Dystiny is with Jesus. I think that’s what keeps me personally going, knowing that Dystiny is at peace with her maker,” said Kathy.

She said her granddaughter was full of life. A generous spirit, involved with the youth program at her church and a volunteer at a homeless shelter.

“When she walked in the room, the party started. Everyone knew Dystiny was there,” said Kathy.

But she said Dystiny was also a teenager who, shortly before her death, started making bad decisions and hanging out with people Kathy didn’t know.

“She went astray and I’m the first to admit it. She went astray. Dystiny was teetering in between the two worlds. She knew right from wrong. But unfortunately when we get caught up with something, it’s so hard to get out of it,” said Kathy.

How does a child go from being active in the church and feeding the homeless to being sucked in by the streets and drugs? A lot of people will blame the mother because she was obviously an addict herself but Dystiny did not live with her mother. Dystiny’s grandmother raised her according to every report I have read and family/friends statements. Surely there were signs that this young girl was getting in over her head so why didn’t someone do something? I guess none of these questions matter now, she is dead. What does matter is that this can happen with any child, it’s up to the parent or guardian to stop it.

Source: Unforgottenangels

Horror as supermarket worker gets arm stuck in a MEAT GRINDER

Gruesome: Authorities were called to an Illinois supermarket to rescue a man whose arm was stuck in a meat grinder.

Gruesome: Authorities were called to an Illinois supermarket to rescue a man whose arm was stuck in a meat grinder

A gruesome scene unfolded at a local Illinois supermarket when authorities were called in to rescue a man who got his arm stuck in a meat grinder.

When members of the Orland Park Fire Department arrived at the scene of the grisly accident, they were shocked to discover a middle-aged store employee with more than half his arm caught in the machine. 

Battalion chief Mike Schofield told ABC News that in his 35 years at the department, he had ‘never seen anything like this, other thank watching T.V. shows.’

Though apt, based on witness accounts, it seems that ‘horror movie’ would be a better comparison.

According to Schofield, the man’s was caught so deeply in the gears of the machine that first responders were unable to remove his arm even after dismantling some of the device. 

They were hesitant to take apart the entire machine any more for fear of taking off part of his arm.

While the victim was clearly in immense pain, Schofield explained that there wasn’t very much blood at the scene, because the grinder apparently cut of much of the circulation in his arm.

“There wasn’t a lot of blood because his hand was so tight in the meat grinder it almost acted like a tourniquet,” Schofield said.

Realizing that not much more could be done at the supermarket, paramedics took the man to the hospital with part of the device still attached to his arm.

Once there, they decided the only way to extricate the man’s arms from the grinder was by using what Schofield described as a miniature version of the Jaws of Life, the same tool firefighters use to shear through car doors and other metal objects.

“There’s a miniature hydraulic tool that we use to extract smaller items,’ he said. ‘It’s like the jaws of life but it’s a smaller version, so we used it to cut the metal apart and peel back the grinder. That took approximately 20 minutes to do.’

 
Crushed: Paramedics and doctors had to use a miniature version of the Jaws of Life to cut through the meat grinder.

Crushed: Paramedics and doctors had to use a miniature version of the Jaws of Life to cut through the meat grinder.

Schofield said that during the process the man remained relatively calm, despite being in a great deal of pain.

“He was just praying. He was pretty sedated, but he was still in pain,” he said. “We had two paramedics constantly talking to him, reassuring him. We explained every step we were going to do. He was able to tell us when it hurt too much and we were able to back off and the doctors were providing pain medicine for him.” 

After firefighters and doctors managed to get the grinder off, pressure returned to the man’s arm and he began bleeding profusely. He was quickly taken of to surgery to repair the damage. 

Schofield said that the man’s arm was ‘OK’ but guessed that his hand would be heavily damaged. There were no more updates on the man’s condition.

Source: Dailymail.co.uk

The Lizzie Borden Legand

English: Lizzie Borden

English: Lizzie Borden (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

 

Lizzie Borden took an axe
And gave her mother forty whacks.
And when she saw what she had done,
She gave her father forty-one.

Photo of the Borden house on 92 Second Street in Fall River, Massachusetts

→ The Borden house that still stands on 92 Second Street may now be a bed and breakfast but on August 4, 1892 it was witness to one of the most brutal, unsolved murders in American history. We may never know what really happened that day.

The History
To start from the very beginning – Andrew Borden was one of the richest men in the city of Fall River, he was a self-made businessman with important titles such as President of Union Savings Bank, Durfee Safe Deposit and many others. He had two daughters with his first wife Sarah Morse. The eldest being Emma Borden who was born March 1st of 1851 and the youngest, Lizzie Borden born July 19th 1860. Lizzie would not grow to know her biological mother because in March of 1863 Sarah died of a hemorrhage. On January 18th 1865 Andrew was remarried to Abby Gray, a women that will be remembered due to her graphic departure from life.

It was close to 9am when Lizzie walked down the stairs of her home like many mornings since the family bought the home in 1872. She saw her Stepmother Abby dusting the dining room, Her father Andrew sitting in his large chair in the sitting room and Bridget – the maid who the Borden sister’s insisted on calling ‘Maggie’ which was the name of a pervious servant – was grabbing her pail of water and long pole with a brush to go wash the windows.

Although Bridget had cooked breakfast earlier Lizzie had said she was not hungry and instead had a cup of coffee, Her father had mentioned he might not go to the post office and mail a letter to Emma his eldest daughter who was in Fair Haven for two weeks visiting friends. Earlier that morning about 7am Lizzie’s Uncle John Morse who was the brother of Andrew’s first wife Sarah had left to go visit his nice and nephew. He made several visit’s a year from his home in Dartmouth to visit family and conduct business in Fall River.

Around 9:15 Andrew Borden left and went downtown while Abby went upstairs to make the bed that John was staying in. At 9:30 Abby come downstairs only for a moment till she decided she needed fresh pillowcases and went back up. Bridget continued to wash the outside windows and stop for a few minutes to talk with the hired girl next door, around 10:30 she had gone inside to begin cleaning the inside windows. It’s said during this time Lizzie sat in the kitchen reading an old Harper’s magazine and eating a pear while she waited for the iron to heat up to press some handkerchiefs. Fifteen minutes later Andrew returned home, and was told by his daughter Lizzie, “Mrs. Borden has gone out – she had a note from someone who was sick. The Borden daughters would only address Abby as ‘Mrs. Borden’. He then went to lay down and take a nap in the sitting room, he was completely unaware that his wife was laying dead in the guestroom in a pool of her blood; he also didn’t know he was never to wake from his nap.

Bridget had gone up to her room in the attic to take a nap while Lizzie went to the barn looking for a lead sinker because she planned on going fishing the following Monday, she claimed she had been in the barn for twenty minutes while she ate some more pears she had picked off the pear tree. Afterwards she entered the house and went to the dining room to lay her hat down.

“Maggie, Come down!” Lizzie shouted from the stairs, abruptly waking Bridget from her restless sleep. “What is the matter?” Bridget shouted back as she slipped her shoes on and rushed down the staircase. “Come down quick!” Lizzie screamed out, “Father’s dead! Somebody’s come in and killed him!”

Crime scene photo of Andrew Jackson Borden, Lizzie claimed to have walked into the “sitting room” where she found her father’s murdered body.

Bridget found Lizzie by the back door, her face colorless. Bridget was stopped from entering the sitting room by Lizzie who ordered “Don’t go in there. Go and get the doctor. Run!” Dr. Bowen was a family friend and had only lived across the street, making Bridget’s run fast. Dr. Bowen wasn’t in but Mrs. Bowen was so Bridget told her that Andrew Borden had been killed; She ran back to the Borden house. “Where where you when this thing happened?”

She asked Lizzie “I was out in the yard, and I heard a groan and came in. The screen door was wide open.” Lizzie responded, she then sent Bridget to get the Borden Daughter’s friend, Miss Alice Russell who lived a few blocks away. The neighbors were starting to gather on Lizzie’s lawn, someone had called the police.

Her next door neighbor, Mrs. Adelaide Churchill came over to Lizzie who was still at the back entrance of the house and asked what was wrong, Lizzie responded,
“Oh Mrs. Churchill, someone has killed my father!”
“Where is your father?” she asked,
“In the sitting room.”
“Where were you when it happened?”
“I went to the barn to get a piece of iron.”
“Where is your mother?”

Lizzie said she didn’t know and that her stepmother had received a note asking her to respond to someone who was sick. Soon Dr. Bowen arrived and examined Andrew’s body, Dr. Bowen could not identify the body at first, seven large blows had gashed his face, his nose had been severed and one eye had been cut in half. Most of the blows had been within the area of the eyes, nose and ears. Blood still seeped from the wounds when he had a sheet cover Mr. Borden, but Abby was still unaccounted for. Lizzie had claimed she was sure Abby had come home and Bridget and Mrs. Churchill went upstairs to find Abby dead on the floor of the guestroom.

Above and below are both crime scene photos of Abby Borden at different angles. Lizzie claimed to have not known about her mothers murder until Bridget and Mrs. Churchill went up and discovered her.

 Mrs. Churchill would later say that she only “Looked like the form of a person.”, she like her husband had been beaten to death by an axe. Dr. Bowen noticed that Abby had been struck over a dozen times from the back of her head, in her autopsy it was revealed that there was nineteen blows to the head.

The axe used to murder Mr & Mrs Borden is now believed to be part of the Lizzie Borden museum located in Fall River, MA

Pictured above: Crime scene (close-up) of Andrew Borden’s butchered body.

Crime scene photo showing the back of Abby Borden’s butchered head.

The next hour or so at the Borden home was chaotic, people were all over the house sneaking looks at the gruesome state of the bodies and comforting Lizzie. All the people had destroyed any clues that could have been left behind; The reason being the annual picnic of the Fall River Department was hosted that day and only one officer had gone to the Borden house, George W. Allen, and after only being there a few moments he had ran the 400 yards back to the department to tell the city marshal the gruesome details.

On August 12th 1892 Lizzie was arrested for the murders of her father Andrew and stepmother Abby. The trial lasted from June 5th of ‘93 to June 19th. Although people had testified that only days earlier Lizzie tried to buy poison from a Smith‘s drug store, Miss Alice Russell said she had seen Lizzie burn a dress in the kitchen stove, and the fact that Lizzie’s story was barely believable because the barn she claimed to be in was dusty and untouched, the ‘letter’ Abby had supposedly received was never found and that her motive was clear because her father was going to rewrite his will leaving almost everything to Abby instead of his daughters, she was found not guilty on all counts by a jury of twelve middle-aged farmers and salesmen.

Five weeks after the trial had ended Lizzie (Who at this point went by ‘Lizbeth’ instead) and her sister Emma bought a thirteen bedroom Victorian house at 306 French St. on ‘The Hill’ which was the most fashionable area of the city. Lizzie had the name of her new home carved into the top step leading to the front door, this house was dubbed ‘Maplecroft’. In 1904 Lizzie befriended a young actress, Nance O’Neil who was rumored to be having an affair with Lizzie, She would often throw parties for her new friend at Maplecroft. In 1905 Emma and Lizzie got into a fight of an unknown subject and Emma moved away, the two never spoke again.

On June 1st 1927 Lizzie died after a long illness from complications of gall bladder surgery. Strangely enough Emma died only a few days later on June 10th after falling down the stairs at her home. They were buried in plots next to Andrew and Abby.

Many theories still float around as to what went down that day, but who ever had killed Andrew and Abby has brought their secret to the grave with them, all that is left is spirits who will never rest until this mystery is solved.

Encounters
You looking for a place to rest your head and go home with creepy stories? Thrill seekers, Ghost hunters and people who want to be spooked alike can now stay in the Borden house that is now a bed and breakfast designed to make you feel like your back in 1892. Almost everyone that stays there has a story to tell of the paranormal activity they experienced. Doors will often open and close when no one is around to have done it, heavy footsteps on the stairs can be heard, figures will be seen roaming the halls and rooms, beds becoming messy within seconds of looking away.

On rare occasions people have even reported to seeing a women making the bed in the guestroom, even when they are still laying in it. Muffled conversations are common coming from vacant rooms. One of the most creepy reports is people seeing the form of a person sleeping in a bed when no one is there. Items have also been known to go missing only to appear much later in either the same area or different. Ready to go home with chills in your spine? Enter at your own risk.

The Stats – (Where applicable)

• Style of Haunting: Apparitions
• Top 100 Ranking: 39
• Location: Fall River, Massachusetts
• Date Location Was Constructed: 1845

All credit goes to UnknownExplorers the only thing I’ve contributed to this story is the photos taken from various articles. Also, if you would like more information regarding the Borden’s then you might like LizzieAndrewBorden.com and/or MondoLizzie.com

Man Strangles Fiancee’s Daughter, 24, After Fantasizing About Having Sex With Her DEAD Body Then Helped Her Son, 3, Get Ready For Halloween

11/02/12 MICHIGAN — A pastor accused of beating and strangling a neighbor to fulfill a sexual fantasy was engaged to the victim’s mother and had asked church members to pray for the young woman before police found her body, a friend said on Friday.

Ex-convict John D. White, from Michigan, told investigators that after killing 24-year-old Rebekah Gay in her trailer in rural Isabella County early on Wednesday, he hid her body in nearby woods then returned to the trailer to dress her three-year-old son in a Halloween costume, ready for the boy’s father to pick him up.

White told investigators he repeatedly struck Gay’s head with a mallet then strangled her with a zip tie, according to the Isabella County sheriff’s office. 

 
Twisted: Pastor John White told investigators he repeatedly struck his fiancee's daughter Rebekah Gay's head with a mallet then strangled her with a zip tie at her Mount Pleasant trailer

Twisted: Pastor John White told investigators he repeatedly struck his fiancee’s daughter Rebekah Gay’s head with a mallet then strangled her with a zip tie at her Mount Pleasant trailer

Victim: Rebekah Gay's three-year-old son was home when his mother was attacked

Victim: Rebekah Gay’s three-year-old son was home when his mother was attacked

He said he stripped her but does not remember if he carried out his fantasy of having sex with Gay’s dead body.

‘We are all absolutely floored,’ said Donna Houghton, 76, who had a role in hiring White to be pastor at the 14-member Christ Community Fellowship three years ago. 

She said she protested his innocence until she heard he had confessed.

‘Then he had no leg to stand on,’ she told The Associated Press.

White led investigators to Gay’s body in a wooded area a half-mile away from the trailer park and later Wednesday was charged with first-degree murder. He remained jailed without bond on Friday.

Gay and White lived in the same trailer park in Broomfield Township, 85 miles northwest of Lansing, and White was engaged to Gay’s mother who was a regular at his Sunday sermons, Houghton said. She said the pastor often watched Gay’s son while she was at work.

White ‘really liked this young man,’ Sheriff Leo Mioduszewski said.

Houghton said that before White was arrested he had called her to ask that she contact other church members and start a prayer chain for Gay, who was still missing at the time.

‘He was pretty shook up. He said the police were giving him a hard time,’ Houghton said.

She said the tiny congregation was aware of White’s criminal past when he joined the church.

He was released from prison in 2007 after serving nearly 12 years for manslaughter in the death of a 26-year-old woman in Kalamazoo County, according to the state Corrections Department.

 
Confession: Wearing a 'suicide prevention suit', White confessed to hiding Gay's naked body after beating her to death but says he cannot remember whether he acted out his fantasy of having sex with her body

Confession: Wearing a ‘suicide prevention suit’, White confessed to hiding Gay’s naked body after beating her to death but says he cannot remember whether he acted out his fantasy of having sex with her body

White also was sentenced to probation for choking and stabbing a 17-year-old Battle Creek girl in 1981.

‘He was absolutely contrite,’ Houghton said. ‘All kinds of people turn around and meet the Lord and they are a different person. 

‘He was doing a lot of good in the community… He was doing a lot of good and Satan did not want him doing good, and Satan got to him.’

 
Police cordoned off an area close to the crime scene near the Broomfield Valley Mobile Home Park in Michigan

Police cordoned off an area close to the crime scene near the Broomfield Valley Mobile Home Park in Michigan

Source: Dailymail.co.uk 

The Greyhound Bus Beheading

Photo’s above/below show Tim McLean, a young man brutally murdered while resting on a Greyhound bus on his way home from work

EDMONTON, CANADA — Tim McLean, Jr, born October 3, 1985 was a 22-year-old Canadian carnival worker who lived in Winnipeg, Manitoba located in Canada.  Due to his job, the young man had to travel and take the Greyhound bus to transport back home.

Those who knew Tim had nothing but great things to say about him, according to a friend,  he was a laid-back person with a great personality that could make even the saddest person smile. The type of guy who was respectful to everyone and never got into trouble.

On July 30, 2008 Tim boarded a greyhound bus and was on his way to Winnipeg after working all day at the carnival in Edmonton. He had sent his father a quick text-message asking him if he could come home for the night. His father messaged him back telling him of course he could.

That was the last contact the two would ever have.

The bus was pretty packed and loud so the young man decided to take out his headphones and listen to some music and relax, probably tired from a long day of work. After putting his head-phones on he laid his head back on the seat and closed his eyes, minding his own business and eventually nodding off.

Unfortunately, he was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Vince Weiguang Li, 40, of Edmondton was also on the Greyhound that same night.

Vince Weiguang Li, 40, in a photo taken after the greyhound incident. He is being led by officers

Tim McLean was attacked randomly with a butcher knife

Li was initially sitting by himself but for some reason he suddenly moved from his seat and sat in the empty one next to Tim, who was still sleeping with his head leaned back. As the bus was driving on the Trans Canada Highway, about 18 miles west of Portage la Prairie, Manitoba.

Tim minding his business, still resting when all of a sudden, with no rhyme or reason, Li took out a butcher’s knife (shown above) an within seconds, he stabbed him in his throat. Garnet Caton, a witness on the bus that night, said he heard a “blood curling scream” and turned around to see Li repeatedly stabbing Tim.

Passengers on the bus were shocked, screaming in horror as Li, 40, continued to stab the young man who at this point awoke to his violent death. Li continued to stab him between 40 to 60 times. The passengers were scrambling to get out of the bus which was stopped on the TC-Highway. It all happened within moments and amid all the chaos, some of the bus-goers still didn’t understand what was going on, but it soon sank in and the horror-stricken passengers by this point, were outside of the bus.  Some kept running, others puked, all were shocked at the brutality of the crime.

The bus driver, a passenger and a driver of a truck who had pulled over moments earlier, trapped Li inside the bus until the police came.

During this time, Li had already decapitated Tim. He then slowly walked up to the front of the bus, holding up the young man’s head in an attempt to show everyone outside the bus what he had done. He then waved the head at the shocked audience. At this point he was already in the front of the bus and stared coldly at the three men blocking the doorway, even slashing the butcher knife at them, but thankfully missing. But that didn’t stop the brave men from keeping him locked in the bus.

Police arrived after what felt like hours. A stand-off ensued for several hours but eventually, officer’s were able to contain and put the handcuffs on him.

Officers and their vehicles surround the Greyhound bus during the stand-off

Authorities at the crime scene after the horrific murder

Tim McLean and Vince Li did not know each other. The random attack appeared to be unprovoked. Police later found the ears belonging to the victim in the pockets of Li who is also believed to have consumed parts of his victim.

The Greyhound bus had made its last stop in Brandon, Manitoba on a long journey that originated in Edmonton, Alberta and headed for Winnipeg. The attack occurred approximately 12 miles west of Portage La Prairie, on a desolate plains stretch of the Trans Canada Highway. Men, women and children who witnessed the attack were in shock, crying, some becoming physically ill as they waited by the roadside for several hours while police tried to get Li to exit the bus. He was finally apprehended at 1:28 am after Li tried to break out of a bus window.

Canada.com:
“He didn’t do anything to provoke the guy. The guy just took a knife out and stabbed him, started stabbing him like crazy and cut his head off,” said Garnet Caton, 26, a passenger on the Edmonton to Winnipeg bus on the night of 07/30/08

BBC:
“He calmly walks up to the front [of the bus] with the head in his hand and the knife and just calmly stares at us and drops the head right in front of us,” Mr Caton said.
“There was no rage in him… It was just like he was a robot or something,” he added.

The attack appeared to be unprovoked and it is thought the killer did not know his victim.

The passengers, many of whom were badly shaken by what they witnessed, were taken to a hotel in Brandon, Manitoba, and were given crisis counselling.

Canton also indicated that right before the attack, Li had just changed seats to sit next to his victim. Tim McLean, who had boarded the bus in Edmonton, was a summer carnival worker for the past three years at Vancouver’s Pacific National Exhibition.

On Friday, a bruised and bandaged Li appeared in court in Portage La Prairie, where he was charged with second degree murder. Li said few words and nodded his head when Judge Rocky Pollack asked him if he was exercising his right not to speak. Pollack ordered a psychological evaluation of Li pending Li having the opportunity to speak to an attorney. Li worked for a MacDonald’s in Edmonton as well as delivering newspapers for a distribution firm. His delivery employer, Vincent Augert said,

“I believe he was having some marital problems.” When he met with Li to hire him back as a newspaper distributor, he said, “you could almost read between the lines” from the way Li was talking “that there was something not right there.”

Just as the bus was leaving Brandon, McLean sent a text message to his father, asking if he could come home for a night, Tim McLean, Sr., told CBS news. That was his last communication with his son.

Friends of McLean bonded together to grieve for a man described as a “sweet man,” a “ladies man,” a “bright and bubbly guy who was always out for fun.” One friend, who traveled with him had nicknamed McLean “Tiny Tim.”

I can’t imagine the terror that these passengers went through, having to witness this horrific event. Please leave a condolence message for the family of Tim McLean, here, whose bright life ended so tragically.

America’s Youngest Serial Killer – Craig Chandler Price

Pictured; Craig Chandler Price (Park Elementary) School-photo taken in his younger years.

On September 4, 1989, Marie Bouchard went to check on her daughter Joan Heaton, 39, and her two grandchildren, Jennifer, 10, and Melissa, 8, at their home on Metropolitan Drive in the Buttonwoods area of Warwick, R.I. She was concerned because she hadn’t heard from them over the Labor Day weekend. Marie’s other daughter, Mary Lou, accompanied her to Joan’s house. It was a visit that would change their lives forever.

Pictured; The Heaton’s at Church – Joan, 39, Jennifer (10) and Melissa (8)

When Marie and Mary Lou went to the house, they found it unusual that no one answered the door when they called. They knew Joan must have been nearby because her car was still parked in the driveway, so they rang the doorbell several more times. Still, there was no answer. They decided to take a look inside the house.

When they entered, they immediately knew something was terribly wrong. The interior was splattered with blood and a putrid smell permeated the air. As they walked further into the house, they made a heart-wrenching discovery.

They saw Joan lying beneath blood-soaked sheets in the hallway. Her oldest daughter, Jennifer, was lying nearby and Melissa was on the kitchen floor. All three had been brutally murdered.

Marie and Mary Lou were horror-stricken. Just days earlier Marie had spent the day with Joan and her grandchildren shopping and enjoying time together. It was hard to imagine that they were all dead.

The mother and daughter called the police soon after they discovered the bodies. Within moments, rescue workers arrived on the scene followed shortly thereafter by detectives. The house was cordoned off and an investigation of the crime scene began.

Detectives were shocked at the savagery of the crime. Even the most seasoned investigators had difficulty holding back tears. All the victims had been stabbed multiple times with kitchen knives. The youngest child, Melissa, was stabbed so fiercely that one of the blades actually broke off in her neck. She also had her skull bashed in with a kitchen stool. Apart from the 57 stab wounds inflicted on her body, Joan was also bludgeoned and strangled. It was believed that they were murdered three days prior to the discovery.

The heinous murders were the worst the city had seen in recent times. News of the triple homicide sent shock waves through the small town. No one felt safe and residents looked to the police for answers. Even though investigators had little to go on, they vowed to find the murderer. It was a promise they would keep.

The Warwick Police Department had their finest working on the case. They were determined to catch the person responsible for the murders and they worked day and night reviewing evidence and interviewing locals who might have information related to the crime. They also enlisted one of the FBI’s top profilers, Gregg O. McCrary, to assist in the investigation.

McCrary stated in his book The Unknown Darkness, that he believed the murderer was likely someone from the Heaton’s neighborhood. Moreover, he suggested the crime was probably connected with another unsolved murder that took place two years earlier in Buttonwoods. The coincidences between the crimes were significant.

In July 1987, Rebecca Spencer, 27, was found dead in her living room. She had been stabbed repeatedly with a packing knife. At the time of her death she was preparing to move to another neighborhood.

Photo of Rebecca Spencer and her son Steven, taken in 1979. Rebecca was a divorced mother of two who lived two doors from Price on Inez Avenue in the Buttonwoods neighborhood of Warwick, RI. The crime went unsolved for more than two years.

In both the Heaton and the Spencer cases, the killer used a weapon that was already present in the house. This presented strong evidence that the killer originally entered the residence for another purpose, such as to burglarize the house. It is likely that the intruder was caught unaware and murdered the eyewitnesses using what McCrary referred to as a “weapon of opportunity.”

Robbers often burglarize houses they know. The more familiar you are with the contents of a house, the more successful your robbery will be. Consequently, burglars regularly choose to rob houses that are close to where they live. McCrary suggested that in both cases the murderer likely entered the residences with the intention of robbing and probably was familiar with the houses and/or residents. Moreover, he believed the murderer lived in the Buttonwoods area because both crimes were committed five houses from one another.

Another similarity between the cases was an unusual display of “overkill.” Joan and Rebecca were stabbed approximately 60 times each, and the children approximately 30 times. Due to the excessive nature of the crimes, it was highly probable that the same person committed the murders.

McCrary suggested to investigators that the “frenetic manner of the stabbing,” used to kill the Heatons likely resulted in the murderer stabbing his own hand. He told them that they should look for someone in the neighborhood with a cut or bandaged hand. McCrary’s advice was of great use to investigators because it significantly narrowed the search for a suspect. They had a location in which to begin and a possible characteristic of the suspect. All they needed was some luck.

On September 5, 1989, just one day after the bodies were discovered, investigators got their first real break in the case. According to Denise Lang’s book, A Call for Justice, police detectives Ray Pendergast and Mark Brandreth were driving through a park near Buttonwoods, “when Pendergast spotted a familiar face.” They stopped the car to talk to a neighborhood boy named Craig Price, 15, who Pendergast once coached in a local basketball program.

Pendergast asked the youth if he heard about the murders. Craig responded with concern that he was aware of what had happened and that he had seen the bodies coming out of the house the day before. He lived just a few doors away from the Heaton family.

During the conversation, Pendergast and Brandreth noticed that Craig had a bandage on his hand. Suspicious, Pendergast asked how he hurt himself. Craig claimed that he got drunk several nights earlier and punched his hand through a car window on Keeley Avenue. As the detectives pulled away they could not help but wonder if Craig was telling the truth about his hand. Why would he admit to two police officers that he vandalized a car?

It seemed unlikely that a teenager would commit such ghastly crimes as the Heaton murders, let alone such a good-humored and vivacious kid as Craig. However, the fact that the boy had a cut on his hand and lived on the same street as the Heatons was too much of a coincidence to ignore. It was something both officers felt compelled to follow up on, which they did.

The detectives wrote up a report and began to investigate Craig’s story. They learned that there was no police report of a car window being smashed in the area Craig mentioned. They also went to Keeley Avenue and found no evidence of glass on the street. The two detectives began to further doubt Craig’s story.

Craig became a viable suspect in the Heaton murders. Even though many in the department believed the officers were wasting their time investigating him, Pendergast and Brandreth decided to follow their gut feelings and pursue Craig as a lead. They just needed more evidence to support their theory.

In the meantime, expert blood analyst Dr. Henry Lee was contacted by police and asked to examine the Heatons’ residence for clues. He went to the house and analyzed the blood splatters and trails. During his investigation, he gathered vital clues from the crime scene including a bloody sock imprint. Whoever left the imprint wore a size 13 shoe.

Craig Price was not an average teenager. At age 15, he already had a history of offenses including a record of breaking and entering, theft, peeping into houses and using drugs. He was also known to have a violent temper. Police had been called to his house on more than one occasion to settle disputes in which he was involved.

Investigators working on the Heaton case decided it was time to question Craig more thoroughly. They went to Craig’s house and asked him to come with his parents to the police station, which they did. During questioning, Craig was asked more detailed questions about how he cut his hand. He maintained his story that he hurt himself while trying to break into a car. Investigators were not convinced and asked him to take a lie-detector test.

The following day, Craig submitted to a polygraph. He was asked questions relating to how he cut his hand. The test revealed that Craig was lying. According to Lang, “it was the first big break in the case.”

Pictured; Warwick Police Department Building

Even though the polygraph proved that Craig was dishonest, however, it didn’t prove that he was involved in the murders. Investigators needed more evidence.

During interviews with Craig’s friends and acquaintances, investigators learned that he ran with a gang of juvenile delinquents who were known to burglarize houses. More significantly, they discovered that Craig boasted about killing Rebecca Spencer. It was the first evidence they had connecting Craig to a murder. Investigators were quick to obtain a search warrant for his house.

Detectives Kevin Collins, Arthur Anderson and Tim Colgan organized a search team. They devised a plan to set up overnight surveillance of the house before actually going in to search the residence. They wanted to make sure Craig was there and didn’t leave the premises.

In the early morning hours of September 17, detectives gave the signal to move in on the house. A team of officers led by Collins, Anderson and Colgan rang the doorbell. Craig’s father answered the door and was shocked to see the police on his doorstep. He had no choice but to let them in.

The rest of the family, including Craig, his mother and brother were awakened and asked to sit in the living room during the search. They were all visibly distressed by the drama, except for Craig who dozed off to sleep on the couch. It didn’t take investigators long to find what they were looking for.

While searching the shed behind the house, a trash bag was found full of incriminating evidence. Within the bag were several bloody knives from the Heaton household, along with bloodied articles of clothing, gloves and other objects. Investigators woke up Craig and arrested him for the murders of Joan, Jennifer and Melissa. Surprisingly, he seemed unaffected.

Pictured; Craig, 15, being arrested at his home in Buttonwood’s as he smirks for the camera-crew.

Craig was ushered from his house to the police station with his parents in tow. He was booked, then interrogated about the murders. The detectives hoped Craig would come clean about his crimes. They got more than expected.

During the interview, Craig amazed detectives when he immediately confessed to the Heaton murders. He described in detail the events of the fateful night, although his story periodically changed. Eventually, he became worn out and decided that it was easier to tell the truth. According to Lang, “what came out of his mouth next stunned even the most experienced and jaded listeners and sent his father, John Price, to the men’s room to vomit, rendering him unable to return.”

Craig’s horrified mother stood by her son as he recounted the events that took place at the Heaton residence approximately two weeks earlier. He told his interrogators that his primary intention was to burglarize the house. He said that he found an open window in the kitchen, which he crawled through. He accidentally landed on a table, which broke but, despite the noise, he continued in the burglary.

He claimed that he walked through the residence looking for items to steal. He didn’t realize that the noise had awakened Joan. She walked into the kitchen and spotted Craig when she turned on the light. In a state of panic, Craig said that he grabbed Joan, then beat and strangled her. Joan’s screams woke up the children who stumbled out of their beds to the hallway. Melissa ran to the kitchen to call the police but Craig overpowered her.

Craig tackled the girls to the floor, then went to the kitchen, grabbed some knives and began to stab them all. During the attack, one of the girls bit Craig’s hand. In a fit of rage, he bit the girl back on the face. Craig also bit Joan. Moreover, he smashed the youngest girl over the head with a stool, when she continued to struggle against him. Craig didn’t expect that the three would put up such a fight, but they did. They fought until they succumbed to their injuries.

Craig said that during the murders he had accidentally stabbed his hand. He removed the gloves he was wearing and tended to his injuries in the bathroom. He didn’t realize that he left a trail of blood and sock prints behind him.

Evidence collected from the crime scene was later found to support Craig’s story. The blood analysis conducted by Dr. Lee showed that some of the blood samples matched Craig’s blood type. Moreover, Craig’s shoe size was the same as the sock prints. There was no doubt he was telling the truth.

Craig further admitted to covering the Heatons’ bodies with blankets, probably out of shame for what he had done. He then tried to clean up the crime scene with towels but he feared that if he stayed too long police would catch him. He quickly gathered the knives, gloves and some of the bloodied towels and sprinted from the scene.

Craig said he immediately returned to his home several doors away. He confessed that he hid his blood-soaked clothes in a bag in the attic. Detectives were alerted to the evidence and later found the bag in the precise location where Craig said it could be found.

Following Craig’s detailed account of the Heaton murders, he surprised detectives again. When asked about Rebecca Spencer, Craig admitted that he also killed her. He was just 13 years old at the time.

Craig had no difficulty remembering his first murder. He provided investigators with details of the night in question, while showing little remorse for what he had done. After his confession, a wave of disgust mixed with relief passed over the detectives. Four murders solved within the space of several hours was a rare break.

Investigators working on the case were glad they finally had their man. They just hoped Craig would get what he deserved for the atrocities he committed, preferably a very long prison sentence. They would have a long wait.

Craig Price had the law on his side. Despite the brutal murders he committed, Craig would never have to face a trial or serve prison time because he confessed to his crimes just weeks before his 16th birthday. According to Rhode Island state law, all the courts could do was hold him in a training school until his 21st birthday and no longer. Thus after five years, Craig would be a free man with a clean record.

The thought of Craig serving only five years for four brutal murders enraged the citizens of Rhode Island, especially the families of the victims. It was obvious that the law was working against them. However, at the time of Craig’s offense, teenage serial killers below the age of 16 were a rare phenomenon. In fact, Craig was considered to be one of the country’s youngest serial killers.

Even though Craig could not be tried for the murders, he still had to undergo a court hearing before he could be placed in the training school. On September 21, 1989 Craig appeared before Judge Carmine R. DiPetrillo at the Kent County Courthouse. During the brief proceedings, Craig was presented with the murder and burglary charges against him, to which he pleaded guilty.

WPD escorting Price to Kent County Court House

Craig was ordered to serve five years at the Rhode Island Training School’s Youth Correctional Center (YCC), a maximum-security detention facility. He was also ordered to undergo intense psychological examination and therapy. However, Craig refused treatment. Moreover, he refused to officially discuss the murders at all by pleading the Fifth Amendment.

Craig withdrew from the diagnostic and treatment program arranged by the judge on the advice of his lawyers. According to court documents, the reasoning behind the decision was based on fears that the psychiatric examination might, “result in his being placed in a psychiatric facility for commitment beyond his twenty-first birthday.” Despite court intervention, Craig stuck to his guns and refused to submit to any psychological measures.

In the meantime, Craig carried on with life within the institution. He completed his high school equivalency test and began taking satellite college courses. He believed he needed to improve himself academically so that he could get a good job when he was let out of the YCC.

By 1993, Craig developed a reputation for good behavior within the training school, despite the fact that he refused treatment. In fact, he was in such good standing that his superiors granted him permission to counsel other youths at the facility. Moreover, Gina Macris suggested in a 1993 article in The Providence Journal that Craig also performed light security duties, which included patrolling the school’s hallways. Craig was even allowed to make a rap video at the school, which included threatening lyrics.

When the news broke of Craig’s special treatment at the facility, Rhode Island citizens and the families of the victims demanded that it be stopped. After much protest it ended, but the bigger problem still remained. Time was running short and Craig’s release date was steadily approaching. There was less than one and a half years to work out a way to prevent him from being freed.

Four figures were instrumental in the campaign to stop Craig’s release. They were Joan Heaton’s mother, Marie; her sister, Mary Lou; Capt. Kevin Collins, who led the Heaton investigation; and Assistant Attorney General Jeffrey Pine. From the beginning, they lobbied the Rhode Island legislature to institute new bills to prevent Craig’s release and others like him. Moreover, they went out of their way to inform the world of Craig’s crimes and his upcoming release. Together, they tried every possible avenue to prevent Craig from having the chance to murder again.

In 1990, Pine and Collins were key figures in instigating the passing of the O’Neil bill, which toughened sentences on teenage murderers. In 1993, Pine introduced a controversial bill that would give the Office of the Attorney General the power to civilly commit a mentally ill individual to a mental institution if the person posed a danger to society. Many thought the bill would discriminate against the mentally ill and give those with psychological problems a bad name. It was also argued that the bill specifically targeted Craig and could be used to prevent him from ever being freed.

Pine stood his ground. His main interest was making sure Craig stayed locked up for as long as possible. Lang quoted Pine as saying, “I will do everything I can to prevent another tragedy.” Much to his delight and that of the families of the victims, the Craig Price Bill was passed that same year. It was a huge step, which they hoped would result in Craig being forced to submit to a psychiatric diagnostic and treatment program.

In October 1993, Collins organized Citizens Opposed to the Release of Price (CORP). The nonprofit organization concentrated on raising funds that would be used to increase public awareness about Craig’s crimes and assist with lobbying efforts. The goal was to get critical bills passed that would prevent Craig from being released.

Marie and Mary Lou also helped lead the growing campaign. They traveled throughout the state alerting the general public about Craig’s upcoming release. According to a Time article by Jill Smolowe, the group worked endlessly, rallying to get funding, petitions signed and information to the public, hoping to “make Price’s name a household word.” Within months the organization attracted hundreds of volunteers, raised tens of thousands of dollars and gained national attention.

In the interim, Craig was preparing himself to begin a new life. By the end of the year he had already been ordered on six occasions to adhere to mandatory psychiatric evaluations and therapy. Nonetheless, he continued to refuse for fear that he would be forced into a mental institution after his five years at the training school. However, his days of hiding behind the Fifth Amendment were numbered.

In May 1994, President Bill Clinton flew to Providence, where he was scheduled to meet and discuss state affairs. Thousands of demonstrators and a circling airplane that carried the banner “Alert! Killer of 4 Craig Price Moving Here!” greeted Clinton as he arrived in the city. It was clear that the citizens of Rhode Island wanted something done about the Craig Price matter, and they were not going to give up until the problem was solved.

In a televised interview, Clinton expressed his dismay about Craig being let out in approximately six months. He suggested that the records of juvenile offenders should not be sealed but publicly accessible. He also mentioned that the laws needed to be changed to prevent juveniles with a violent history from purchasing firearms.

Just 15 days after Clinton aired his comments, Rhode Island lawmakers reviewed bills concerning public access to juvenile criminal records and juvenile gun laws. However, the problem concerning Craig’s release was still unanswered. Craig’s luck was about to change.

On June 8, 1994, Rhode Island residents were shocked to learn that Craig was indicted on one count of simple assault and extortion for threatening to injure Officer Mark Petrella, a training school employee. One week later, Craig was arraigned and bail was set at $500,000. His trial was scheduled for later that fall.

That same month Craig faced another problem. His refusal to submit to psychiatric examinations and therapy had gone on too long. He was warned that he was in danger of being held in contempt of court if he failed to undergo treatment. Yet, he would not sway.

Craig’s hearing took place on June 27 at the Providence County Family Court before Judge S. Jeremiah Jr. During the proceedings, Craig was again ordered to undergo a psychiatric exam but his answer remained the same. The judge found him in civil contempt and added an extra year to his incarceration to be served at the Adult Correctional Institution in Cranston, Rhode Island. The only way that Craig could reduce the sentence was by submitting to the court order.

After almost five years, Craig finally complied with the order and agreed to undergo a psychiatric assessment. Dr. Barnum, a forensic psychiatrist and former head of the Boston Juvenile Court Clinic, led the evaluation. Even though Craig participated in the assessment, he didn’t do it whole-heartedly. In fact, it was discovered that he lied about many of the events concerning the murders. It was a matter that would later be addressed by the Family and District Courts. In the meantime, all eyes were focused on the upcoming trial.

On October 3, 1994, Craig’s trial began at the Superior Court in Providence. It was a long-awaited showdown that held the media and country in suspense. A majority of those who packed the courtroom were anxious to see if justice would finally prevail. They wouldn’t have to wait very long.

Overhearing the case was Judge Thomas Needham. Attorney’s Robert Mann and Katie Hynes led the defense team. Prosecutors Patrick Youngs and Mike Stone represented the state’s case against Craig.

The hushed courtroom listened intently to the opening statements made by Stone, as he ushered in one of the state’s most highly publicized trials. He told jurors that they would learn how Craig verbally assaulted Petrella, after he was given a disciplinary report to sign for possession of contraband material (cigarettes and a lighter). Moreover, they would hear how Craig threatened the officer if he continued his job at the facility. The prosecution planned to introduce five witnesses.

Mann’s statements followed those of the prosecution. When he addressed the jury, he didn’t deny that Craig was angry at Petrella’s report or that he used inappropriate language during the confrontation. However, he stated that he would introduce witnesses who would prove that Craig never assaulted or extorted Petrella.

After the opening statements, the prosecution called their first witness, Mark Petrella. For two hours Petrella gave a detailed account of the confrontation and how Craig verbally attacked him using profane language and then threatened to “snuff” him if he ever returned to work. He also said that several officers witnessed the incident and tried unsuccessfully to calm Craig’s increasingly volatile behavior.

Jurors also heard the testimony of four other witnesses who worked at the training school. Their stories agreed with Petrella’s account. Author Lang claimed that at the end of the day the state rested its case, pleased that it, “had gotten their point across and the facts had not been contradicted.”

The next day as the proceedings were set to continue, Mann asked to excuse the jury so that he could address the court alone. Once the jury had left, Mann asked the court for an acquittal based on insufficient evidence. The judge denied the request and ordered the continuation of the proceedings.

As the trial commenced, the defense team introduced Antwyon Carter as their first witness. Carter was an employee at the training school who witnessed the argument first hand between Petrella and Craig. During his testimony, he claimed that he never heard Craig use the word “snuff” against Petrella. Moreover, he suggested that he didn’t take any security measures during or after the incident because he didn’t believe the dispute was a life-threatening situation.

However, during cross-examination by the prosecution, Carter contradicted himself by indicating that Craig’s actions were threatening. The defense’s case was weakened by Carter’s statement. They decided it was time to bring on another witness who worked at the facility. Yet, when the man took the stand, he also suggested that Craig acted in a threatening way towards Petrella. The defense’s case began to fall apart.

The next day, Mann decided to let Craig testify on his own behalf. It was the moment everyone waited for. All eyes turned their attention to Craig when he recounted the argument he had with Petrella.

Craig told the jury that after the cigarettes and lighter were found in his possession, Petrella gave him the impression that he would not report the incident. He suggested that he was surprised and then angered when Petrella presented him with the disciplinary report later that day. He admitted to shouting profanity at the officer but denied having ever threatened to “snuff” him out. Craig believed that Petrella’s report was part of a conspiracy to keep him locked up.

During cross-examination by the prosecution, Craig flew into a rage, claiming that everyone lied to get him in trouble. He told awed listeners that he was the only honest person who had taken the stand during the trial. In fact, he accused prosecutors of being at the head of the conspiracy to put him behind bars permanently.

Craig’s outburst marked the end of the trial. Both the defense and prosecution teams prepared to present their closing arguments for the following day. By the time the news of Craig’s testimony hit the stand, many believed that his hope of attaining freedom was a lost cause. It was only a matter of time.

On October 6, 1994, the defense and the prosecution teams presented their closing arguments. Following brief but powerful arguments, the jury retired to deliberate on the case. It would take them a day to reach a decision.

The next afternoon the jury returned their verdict. Craig was found guilty on both counts of extortion and simple assault. According to Lang, when the verdict was read, “those listening seemed to feel that what he was really found guilty of was the long-ago murders.” Relief spread throughout much of the courtroom as fears of Craig returning to society rapidly diminished.

That December, a hearing was held to determine Craig’s punishment. Judge Needham sentenced him to 15 years, eight of which were suspended, at the Adult Correctional Institution in Cranston. Craig’s problems weren’t over yet.

According to a 2004 article in The Providence Journal, Craig bit a correctional officer’s finger during a brawl in February 1996. The article stated that prosecutors took “the uncommon step” of charging him for probation violation, even though he was still imprisoned. He was also charged with assault. Craig was found guilty of the accusations and sentenced to an additional year in prison.

The next year, Craig was placed on trial for criminal contempt because he failed to comply with the psychological evaluations ordered by the state. The charges against him stemmed from complaints from psychiatrists who claimed that he lied about the events surrounding the murders. During the trial, Craig admitted to the charges and he was eventually found guilty. According to court records, Craig received an additional 25 years on top of his other sentences. Ten of the years were to be served outright with 15 years probation.

In October 1998, seven more years were added to Craig’s sentence for assaulting a correctional officer. It would not be his last time. In February 1999 and again in October 2001, Craig was sentenced to a total of four more years for again verbally and physically assaulting correctional officers.

In 2011 Craig went up for parole and was denied yet again. 2022 will be the next time he is eligable.

Pictured; In 2011, Craig Price, 38, flew in from Florida where he is currently incarcerated to attend a court appearance to see if he would be eligible for parole. He was denied.

 Craig Price’s parents look on during oral arguments before the Rhode Island Supreme Court as the four-time killer seeks a reduction in his 25-year contempt-of-court sentence.  Pool photo by Kathy Borchers/The Providence Journal

To date, there is no telling exactly when Craig Price will ever be released from prison. His projected release date is scheduled for February 2022. However, some don’t expect Craig will be released until well after the date, because of his continuing volatile behavior towards prison guards. Many Rhode Islanders prefer it that way.

Craig Price is 39-years-old as of 2012.

Source: Trutv/Crime Library

Years later, the family of Spencer and the Heaton’s speak about life before and after their loved ones brutally murder(s) – http://www.teenkillers.org/index.php/memorials/rhode-island-victims/rebecca-spencer-joan-jennifer-melissa-heaton/

Mother who called herself a ”monster” in court is sentenced to 99 years for beating her daughter into coma and gluing the tot’s hands to the wall.

On the day of the attack Escalona changed her Facebook profile photo to one of her and Jocelyn and wrote: 'Why does God put obstacles in my life?'

Elizabeth Escalona (left) was sentenced to 99 years for the brutal beating of her toddler daughter (right.)

10/12/12 Dallas, TX →After 5-days of gruelling testimony, Texas mother, Elizabeth Escalona, 23, sat tearfully in court today as she was sentenced by Judge Larry Mitchell to serve 99 years in prison for the savage torture-beating of her two-year old child.

”You savagely beat your daughter to the edge of death,” said the Judge.

In 2011, Elizabeth became so frustrated with her daughter (who isn’t being named due to legal reasons) during potty-training that she glued the child’s hands to the wall and brutally beat her.

Two of Escalona’s other children revealed in court today that their mother kicked their little sister in her stomach and hit her with a milk-jug before gluing her hands to a wall. She also dragged her (although uncertain if she was dragged by the hair.) Some skin had been torn off her little hands. She was hospitalized and in a coma.

Prosecutor Eren Price showed Escalona photo’s of her child’s injuries and asked her if she was a monster. ”A monster did this.” Escalona shook her head and replied a tearful ”Yes.”

Bruises: She hit the girl with enormous objects, including a jug, before dragging her across the floor

Photo’s showed bruises and marks all around the childs little body were also shown in court.

Painful: Other photos shown to the court reveal the bruises along Jocelyn's back after the attack

She hit her with large items including a jug and dragged her across the floor.

Torture: Photographs shown in the court depict Jocelyn's bleeding hands after they were glued to the wall

Photo’s of the toddlers bloody hands after they were glued to a wall were shown in court by prosecutors.

The words shown on an overhead display were written by prosecutor Eren Price, (left) and were shown in court as an emotional Elizabeth Escalona, 23, responds to a line of questioning in court yesterdayLIAR: words shown on an overhead display were written by prosecutor Eren Price,  (left) and were shown in the Dallas County Courtroom as Escalona responded to multiple questions in Yesterdays court-proceedings.

Escalona pleaded with Judge Mitchell for leniency, blaming her ‘black-out’ on childhood sexual-abuse and saying she did not remember the incident that unfolded last year. She said she didn’t remember where she got the glue or why she glued her toddler’s hands to the wall nor did she remember dragging her daughter, throwing things at her or kicking her in the stomach. Overall, she claimed she didn’t remember beating the poor girl into a coma because she wouldn’t potty-train correctly/quickly. Escalona continued to put on the ”water-works” but Price wasn’t buying it and showed her no mercy calling her a ”liar.”

Cross-examination by the prosecutors pointed out that Escalona was a consistently abusive mother who did drugs and beat her children. Proving she lied once again. They also showed she lied when Price was calling her a monter, Escalona was agreeing, calling herself a monter, contradicting her earlier statements of not ”remembering.” ”I hit her, I kicked her constantly, and she  didn’t deserve that,’  said Escalona. ”Only a monster does  that.”

Judge Mitchell, while agreeing that Escalona may have been sexually abused growing up, that it is no excuse for abuse and Judge Mitchell said the simple fact remained, the vicious assault on your child.

‘You savagely beat your child to the edge of  death,’ he said.

Escalona was sentenced to ninety years in prison and must serve at-least thirty to consider parole. Her loved ones cried out, some hanging their heads down in grief and disbelief. The mother of three surprisingly, showed very little emotion considering her theatrics threw-out the trail.

Her children are now in custody of the state and will hopefully get past the trauma they endured and grow up to be everything Elizabeth Escalona is NOT.