Middle Eastern father buried his newborn baby ALIVE because she was deformed

khan-arrestedChand Khan, a father of four children, was arrested less than eight months ago by Pakistani Police. His crime? Burying his infant daughter alive because she was physically deformed.

The infant was born Thursday, July 12, 2012 in a hospital in the nearby town of Kacha Khoh. She would have been Khan’s fifth child but after seeing his newborn daughter and realizing she was physically deformed, he is said to have been shocked and embarrassed and started planning on how to dispose of her, even asking doctors to get ‘rid’ of the baby, suggesting they use poison. Doctors refused.

‘I am a doctor at the same hospital where this child was born. This man came to me yesterday with a request that I should do something to dispose of his child, but I snubbed him and said get out. ‘No one has the right to kill anyone because of his or her physical deformity.’  Mohammed Farooq, a doctor at al-Shifa hospital who cared for the baby after it’s birth.

Photo of Chand Khan with his face covered, being arrested in 2012

Khan then went and told relatives that the child had been a still-born, and many believed him until the baby let out a cry during the funeral service which was held on the evening of July 14, 2012. Many stunned witnesses told Khan to rush his daughter to the hospital but he had a different plan in mind.

“After seeing his newborn daughter, Anwar told his relatives that the baby was born dead. He organized a funeral for her. During the funeral service the baby started crying. The presiding cleric told the father to rush the baby girl to the hospital but instead of going to the hospital he buried the baby,” Shamshad Khalid, the town’s police chief said.

khan-buried-daughter-alive

Photo of Khan being prison bars in 2012

Residents alerted the police after seeing Khan take the baby to a graveyard in Katcha Khowa, Khanewal, in the eastern Punjab province of Pakistan shortly after the funeral service. Police raided his house and arrested him for murder.

The infant’s body was exhumed and an autopsy was performed which indicated she had been alive when she was buried. She was only 2 days old.

“She was healthy and alive but she had a fairly large head and abnormal features,” said Farooq.

Khan did not tell his wife, who was still recovering from the birth at the hospital, about his plans to get rid of their child.

Pakistani human rights activist Farzana Bari has condemned the incident and Raghab Naeemi, a prominent Pakistan religious scholar, demanded a stern punishment for the man if he is found guilty.

The case has also shed light on prejudices in Pakistan against children, especially girls, who are born with physical deformities and/or mental retardation. Many feel embarrassed and shameful and Khan’s case proves that some will go great lengths to dispose of the shame.

Reports said that if found guilty, Khan will receive the death penalty.

Let me out of my coffin, I’m still alive: New book reveals spine-chilling true stories of premature burial (MailOnline)

MailOnline article published March 6, 2013  —

  • Horrifying fate not unusual in Victorian times
  • Methods of determining death were far from reliable
  • Even modern doctors have been known to make mistakes

buried_alive

Mary Best was 17 years old when she contracted cholera in India. All alone since her adoptive mother left the country some months earlier, Mary suffered hours of agonising stomach cramps and sickness, her pulse becoming weaker and weaker until, at last, the doctor pronounced her dead.

She was buried in the vault of her adoptive family a few hours later, in the French cemetery in Calcutta. The year was 1871, and cholera victims were generally buried very soon after death to prevent the germs spreading. In India’s tropical heat, a rapid burial was all the more necessary. Nobody questioned Mary’s hasty interment.

But ten years later, when the vault was opened to admit the body of Mary’s newly deceased uncle by adoption, the undertaker and his assistant were greeted by a horrifying sight.

The lid of Mary’s coffin, which had been nailed down, was on the floor. The girl’s skeleton was half in, half out of the coffin, and the right side of her skull bore a large, ugly fracture. The fingers of her right hand were bent as if clutching at something, perhaps her throat, and her clothes were torn.

Mary, it seemed, had not been dead when she was nailed into a coffin, but merely unconscious.
Cholera victims frequently fell into a coma, and it was in this state that Mary had been buried. Some hours or days later she awoke with no idea where she was.

Before the 20th century, methods of determining death were far from reliable and cases of premature burial was not uncommon

Before the 20th century, methods of determining death were far from reliable and cases of premature burial was not uncommon

The utter terror she endured, her futile screams for help, can barely be imagined. Then, realising she was not being heard, she tried desperately to push the coffin lid off. Straining every muscle, she eventually burst it open.

Perhaps the effort was so great that she fell forward, through exhaustion or fainting, and struck her head on the stone shelf, dying instantly.

More likely, however, finding herself in the pitch darkness of the vault, Mary went mad with terror, tore at her clothes, tried to throttle herself, then banged her head and died.

Click here for full article written and published by Dailymail.co.uk